German Shepherd Day 2 After Spleen Removal



Before I forget to mention it, thank you to all the folks who wrote to me personally on my first post regarding Sascha’s cancer. I appreciate all the thoughts.

So today is day 2 since Sascha had her spleen removed because of three tumors.  We don’t know if it was benign or malignant, and as I think I mentioned in my first post, I probably won’t find that out until mid to late in the week. In short, Sascha appears to be doing great, and quite honestly I’m amazed that she is pretty much acting like her normal self. I know I sure wouldn’t just two days after surgery, but Sascha ate a full meal today (first time since before surgery) and is carrying around a toy wanting me to throw it so she can retrieve (which of course I cannot do until she heals).

While I can’t promise daily pictures and posts about Sascha going through this event, I am going to try and document as much as I can. That being said, let me take you back to early Saturday morning when I got the call from the vet that Sascha was already eating and walking around and that I could come pick her up.  Needless to say I was over-joyed to be able to bring her home as quite frankly they mentioned that may not be likely since she has the spinal myelopathy and would have to be on her back during surgery and would probably be pretty sore.

They bring Sascha in the patient room, and Sascha looks pretty much like she always does, just a little slow, and with quite a bit of fur shaved off around her stomach. Her tail was wagging when she saw me, and she tucked her muzzle into my chin as that’s her normal behavior when she’s really trying to connect with me (or at least my interpretation of her behavior).

We walk out to the truck with no problems. I lift her in the back of the truck and she lays down on her new bed I bought her to be placed in her crate. That look on her face is not what I expected. She looks bright eyed and happy.  Compare to me if I had my spleen removed and you’d see a guy with a scowl on his face wondering how someone could want to take a picture of me after I just got out of surgery. Just another reason why pets can be so awesome!

Sascha laying down in the car after surgery

Sascha laying down in the car after surgery

I get home and several of the neighbors are outside because we were having a community garage sale. A couple of the neighbors knew about Sascha and were curious as to how she was doing. I lift Sascha out of the truck, and she literally pulls me towards the neighbors. This silly dog apparently has no idea she just had surgery one day previous, and also has some spinal degeneration.

After she greets the neighbors and they all pet her, I take her inside to take a picture of her once again, and took a new picture showing her incision.

Day 1 after spleen removal German Shepherd looking at camera

Day 1 after spleen removal German Shepherd looking at camera

Day 1 incision after spleen removal in German Shepherd

Day 1 incision after spleen removal in German Shepherd

You can see from the picture above, the incision is pretty long, running almost the entire length of her stomach.  It’s also rather red around the incision area.  Compare that to day 2, where much of the redness has decreased.

Day 2 incision from spleen removal in German Shepherd

Day 2 incision from spleen removal in German Shepherd

While I may sound rather upbeat about Sascha’s behavior just two days after surgery, I’m under no illusion about the seriousness of what is occurring. While I won’t know the results of the tumors found in her spleen until later in the week, as well as the results about knowing whether or not the cancer has spread, the odds are that it was malignant cancer and it has indeed spread. But, as I promised myself in the first post, I’m really trying to only focus on the present day, not starting a countdown until she may no longer be around.

For those folks that know me personally, there is nothing that I won’t do a little research on to try and gain a little knowledge. The same is true of Sascha’s cancer. I ordered a book from Amazon called Dog Cancer: The Holistic Answer: A Step by Step Guide.  My plan is to gather as much information as I can on traditional treatments as well as holistic approaches so I can make an informed decision on how best to treat Sascha.

Last, but not least, I read something last night that I really wanted to share that really helped me put things in perspective. Assuming Sascha is in the statistical averages regarding her cancer, she may only be around 2-6 months, and depending on the type of cancer, could get chemotherapy which may prolong her life by an additional few months. If you think like a normal human, you might be thinking that if the average German Shepherd only lives 10 years, 4 months, having an additional few months of survival doesn’t sound very significant. However, if you think like a dog, or at least in dog terms, if her life is extended by say 1 year, that’s almost 10% of her entire lifespan! Of course the realist in my quickly returns and reminds me that I will not do chemotherapy, or even continue chemotherapy if Sascha has significant deterioration in her quality of life. If she suddenly stops carrying around a toy, doesn’t want to follow me everywhere I go, and doesn’t have that spark in her eyes, then I refuse to have her endure any type of treatment just to hang around for me. If dogs have memories, then I’m going to do my best to ensure that the memories of her life were full of wonder and joy, of hoarding all toys in the backyard, of chasing squirrels, of swimming in the pool, and always keeping a watchful eye on me and wagging her tail. It will not be of the sickness of chemo, that toys that used to be fun to squeak and hold now take too much effort, and that looking at her owner used to bring her joy but lately it just takes too much energy.

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